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LA – Get the Basics Right Pt. 1

Part one
Explain the following terms in your own words:

The Internet
A platform where everyone with connection can share information world wide.

HTML
A language build up by codes, with the purpose of making websites visible.

Browser
A browser is the internets interpreter. Its job is to translate languages such as HTML to become websites.

Search engine
This is a program that hjelps you find what you are looking for online. By using keywords the program sorts out websites related to the keywords you have entered.

 


 

Please research and add another 10 questions to the briefing process.(See the lesson.)
From this list of 20 questions (your 10 added to my 10), please create the ultimate list of 10 questions that you would use for clients.

My ultimate list of 10 questions to ask clients before making them a website:

1. What kind of visitors are you expecting on your website? (Consider their income, interests, gender and age.) 

2 .Who are your competitors and how do you differ from them?

3. What actions do you want visitors to take on the site? 

4. What is your deadline for completing the site? How big is the budget? 

5. What features should be used on your website? (This includes things like contact forms, pictures, videos, etc.)

6. What do you like about your current website, or wish you had on a website?

7. Do you have any colour preferences? What should the look and feel for the website be/NOT be?

8. Should there be a forum or guestbook, where the content will be visible for anyone?

9. What is most important to you when you visit a website?

10. Why should your visitors come back to your website?

 

 

 

This is the most important principle. You need to understand what a client’s requirements are before you can supply them with a finished product. You need to understand what detail is required and what functionality is needed. You need to also try and establish if your client has any visual preferences and likes. Get their brand guidelines if they have any, otherwise look at all their other printed or design collateral in order to get a clear idea of what direction the design should take. All design needs to have a business objective in order to be effective. The more detailed a brief you can get, the greater the chance that you will come up with a website that meets all your client’s needs.

There are many sources online that can help you come up with all the questions you should ask a client, but here are 10 of the top ones that you definitely need answers to:

1. What kind of visitors are you expecting on your website? (Consider their income, interests, gender and age.) 

This question helps you to understand the potential visitors better. If you know who your target audience is, you can plan the website design and development in a way that would appeal to them. Obviously a site for teenagers will be very different from a site for working moms or businessmen.

2 .Who are your competitors and how do you differ from them?

Most clients will have some competition in cyberspace. Find out what they think of their competitors, how they differ from them and what their strengths and weaknesses are. 

3. What actions do you want visitors to take on the site? 

A website can sell products, provide information, educate or encourage a visitor to make a phone call or fill out a form. Depending on the client’s needs the website structure, functionality and design can vary substantially.

4. What is your deadline for completing the site? How big is the budget? 

These questions help you manage the client’s expectations. Your purpose is to set clear and realistic time frames, which are linked to the budget. In other words, your client can’t expect you to build an extensive website in a day’s time. And they can’t pay for a beat up old VW Beatle and expect a Porsche.   

5. What features should be used on your website? (This includes things like contact forms, pictures, videos, etc.)

We need to know what the client would like to have on the website and manage expectations accordingly. A small company website doesn’t need to have as many features as media portal. Some clients may know exactly what features they would like, while others might have no clue. Guide them by asking questions and showing them examples of other websites. 

6. Please list the names of three sites that you like and explain what you like about them.

Very often a potential client already knows what their website should look like or be similar to, so there’s no need to re-invent the wheel. Be sure to pay attention to exactly what the client wants, otherwise you could waste valuable time and money.

7. Do you have any colour preferences? What should the look and feel for the website be?

Since colour is a very subjective thing, a client may not have the same colour preferences as you do. It’s always a good idea to come up with a colour palette beforehand and show the client what you have in mind. (Keep the colour theory modules of Design 1 and 2 in mind.) You might not always agree with the clients’ choices, but part of being a good designer is being able to make their preferences look good.

8. Who will be the contact person for this project?

Sometimes big companies have more than one person working on a project. Since people have different opinions and ideas, this could get quite chaotic. Ask the client for one contact person that you can deal with if you have questions or need feedback. 

9. What do you NOT want on your site in terms of text, content, colour and graphic elements? 

Sometimes it is as important to know what your client doesn’t like as it is to know what he or she does like. This can help you get a full picture of what the client has in mind for the site. 

10. Who will be responsible for maintaining the website? Will the person have the time and skills to do so?  

If your client asks for a forum, blog or social media integration, they need to understand the time requirements from within their company. They need to make sure that they have the resources available for such a commitment.

My 10 questions:

1.  What do you like about your current website, or wish you had on a website?

2. Is there any information that always should be visible?

3. Should there be a forum or guestbook, where the content will be visible for anyone?

4. What is most important to you when you visit a website?

5. Do you need a webshop?

6. Do you need the site to have language selections?

7. What do you like/dislike about your competitors websites?

8. Do you need any apps on your webpage?

9. What kind of content (text) is your website showing?

10. Why should your visitors come back to your website?

 

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